Date: 15th September 2016 at 8:04pm
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With the closure of the 2016/17 summer transfer window, CIES Football Observatory report has factored this summer’s spending in to look at trends and changes in financial spending across Europe since the 2010/11 season.

Looking back over the last six year period, it’s no great surprise to see the clubs listed across Europe as they are, but some of the surprise comes from the spending of individual clubs when compared to their relative success over that same period.

Clearly in the game spending = a better chance of silverware, but as has been highlighted plenty of times before, spending on it’s own certainly does not guarantee trophies, even if there’s more of a correlation in final league placing – at least in terms of consistently similar finishes.

With Atletico Madrid surprising La Liga in 2013/14 with their title success, Leicester City proved last season that playing to your strengths and being determined can win out, but across 2015/16 Leicester still had a gross spend of £25million + which by some spending standards is obviously low, but it’s hardly chicken feed.

But back to the six year table, out of the 20 clubs highlighted, six are from the Premier League with Manchester City, Chelsea and Manchester United topping the table with over £700million spent each, and Paris Saint-Germain, Barcelona, Liverpool, Real Madrid and Roma make up the next pack with over £500million spent each.

With immense sums like that, the 17th Monthly Report by CIES shows that investment across the five major European leagues since January 2010 have grown almost continually year on year to reach a new record of 4.2billion Euros in 2016.

It must be said they note that 3.7billion Euros is on transfer fees from the summer, with the last January window taking it to 4.2billion Euros for the year.

To put that into perspective, back in 2010 spending was 1.5billion Euros across the five major leagues, and only 2012 bucked the trend of growth.

With so much talk of the Premier League financial dominance, of course the table doesn’t show the dominance in numbers, but the spend itself does and that will only further increase next summer with the new television deal money really then in club coffers.

Much like England though, it’s the French, German, Italian and Spanish clubs you’d expect to see with them dominating their own league divisions to varying degrees – but clearly the top three eclipsing the nearest challenger by over £100million already shows the financial gap.

For the Premier League in 2010 spending was 475million Euros, and for 2016 that rose to 1.8billion Euros on its own and for Europe wide spending England goes from 31.1% of the overall pie to 42.3%.

Although the terms of various television deals in England see a much greater distribution between all clubs in the top flight, and the ratio abroad is lower and more rewarding to successful clubs, although television deals abroad are more to a more equitable distribution in the future.

Again though, this is gross spend not net spend, so clubs more savvy in gaining the best price for outgoings benefit from being able to reinvest that.

Well, look for yourself.

Club
Gross Spend 2010/16
Manchester City
£867m
Chelsea
£737m
Manchester United
£712m
Paris Saint-Germain
£585m
Barcelona
£576m
Liverpool
£561m
Real Madrid
£545m
Juventus
£523m
Roma
£453m
Inter Milan
£438m
Atletico Madrid
£438m
Arsenal
£394m
Tottenham Hotspur
£387m
Napoli
£370m
Bayern Munich
£369m
Monaco
£313m
Wolfsburg
£299m
Valencia
£289m
Borussia Dortmund
£288m
AC Milan
£285m



With January included for 2016 sums, the Premier League has eleven entries in that particular table – and Bournemouth, Watford, Leicester City and Everton feature – with the first three clubs in the Championship as recently as 2014, so the financial dominance more than plays out here.

Again, gross not net spend.

Club
Gross Spend 2016
Manchester City
£196m
Manchester United
£157m
Juventus
£149m
Barcelona
£132m
Chelsea
£126m
Borussia Dortmund
£113m
Arsenal
£109m
Napoli
£108m
Inter Milan
£103m
Atletico Madrid
£86m
Bayern Munich
£84m
Roma
£81m
Liverpool
£81m
Leicester City
£80m
West Ham
£80m
Watford
£75m
Tottenham Hotspur
£73m
Everton
£71m
Paris Saint-Germain
£64m
Bournemouth
£60m



To highlight transfer income more suitably, that is a more mixed table and better dominated by those in Spain, Italy and so on, although Liverpool feature at the top of the table and are joined in the 20 by Tottenham Hotspur, Chelsea, Southampton and Manchester City.

These figures are for 2010/16.

Club
Transfer Income 2010/16
Liverpool
£374m
Valencia
£366m
Juventus
£352m
Benfica
£351m
Porto
£324m
Atletico Madrid
£319m
Tottenham Hotspur
£313m
Roma
£311m
Real Madrid
£306m
Chelsea
£303m
Sevilla
£296m
Monaco
£287m
Barcelona
£250m
Udinese
£247m
Southampton
£227m
Inter Milan
£226m
Napoli
£224m
Genoa
£221m
Manchester City
£209m
Wolfsburg
£203m



In terms of overall redistribution of the money in the game, across the top five European leagues, 34% of the spending on transfer fees went back into the same league, and 32% of spending went to fellow top five European leagues, so whilst sides outside of England’s top flight might not directly benefit from such a rewarding television deal, the Premier League riches are spread across fellow competitions.

And with some clubs more notable for their talent generation, that clearly is a trend that will continue.

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